Skip Navigation LinksSEND-Offer

                                                                                                                                                                                   Logo best qualitym.jpg

 

 

SEND Offer – December 2016

 

 

  1. How does the school know if my child needs help?

We share information about the additional needs of individual children at transition meetings with their pre-school provider before they enter Reception.  Your child may already have identified needs and we will work closely with you to ensure we can meet their needs as they come into primary school.  We hold initial meetings with parents to share information and this provides an opportunity to discuss any concerns you may have the child's teacher.  This may then lead to a meeting with the Class Teacher and Special Needs Coordinator (SENCO) to discuss next steps. 

 

The identification of special educational needs may also arise as a part of observations and discussion which is a normal part of class teaching at any time during your child's primary schooling.  Pupil Progress meetings between teachers, subject leaders, SENCO, Head of School and / or Executive Head teacher also provide a chance to investigate an individual child's development.

 

How will school staff support my child?

The class teacher will take responsibility for the daily provision for your child and consult with the school SENCO as part of this process.  The teacher will discuss with you any support that they think is needed that is additional and different to what we would offer to children as part of our usual practice.  If you and the teacher identify a need for a specific in school assessment or involvement for any outside specialist services then the SENCO will talk to you about this and seek your permission to pursue a particular course of action.  The SENCO then becomes the lead person for liaising with outside agencies and keeping you and everybody in the team around your child of key events and information.

 

  1. How will the curriculum be matched to my child's needs?

High quality classroom teaching is provided for all pupils, with multi-sensory elements to all lessons that ensure all pupils have the best possible access to their learning. Adjusted plans and resources for individual pupils is the next step in responding to children who may have special needs.  For example, a child will be given the opportunity to record information in different ways such as using a laptop or recording device or may undergo a short intervention programme to boost their reading.  This will enable your child to access a broad, balanced and relevant curriculum. Parents will always be made aware and involved in discussion about significant additional support given to their child.

 

If you child is not making the expected progress and has specific gaps in their understanding, they may work within a smaller group of children with access to adult support. Any intervention (steps taken to provide additional support) will be discussed with you.  They may take place in or outside the classroom and may be led by the teacher, support assistant or specialist agency from outside school provided for that purpose.

 

Further specific support may also be provided through a Statement of Educational Needs or an Education, Health and Care Plan (EHCP). This means your child will have been identified by the class teacher and SENCO as needing a particularly high level of individual or small group teaching which cannot be provided from the budget available to the school.

 

 

  1. How will both you and I know how my child is doing and how will you help me to support my child's learning?

General information about class organisation and learning is shared with parents at the beginning of each school year via a 'Meet the Teacher' meeting.  Termly topic letters are also sent out with information about homework and how best to support children at home. 

 

We adopt an open door policy for any daily information that needs to be shared between school and home, before and after school.  Parents and teachers can arrange a more private meeting should there be issues of a more private or serious nature to discuss. 

 

Parents are given information about how their child is progressing for their age within Reading, Writing and Maths through the parent consultation evenings that take place twice a year and within a written report which is sent home in the summer term. Further communication will be established for learners with SEN and are outlined within the school's Special Educational Needs Information Report / SEN policy.

Outside agencies involved with some children may provide reports and information about attainment and progress for health based needs, such as Speech and Language or physical development.

 

  1. What support will there be for my child's overall well-being?

Being a small school means that we have provide a strong, nurturing environment. We work in partnership with parents to ensure that all changes in a child's demeanor and behaviour are shared and we welcome information about situations outside of school that may affect a child's emotional or physical well-being.

 

PSHE is a valued part of our Curriculum and the children follow a programme of learning to help them develop good emotional literacy in relation to their well-being and self-esteem.  We use activities such as Circle Time to ensure that children have an opportunity to discuss their own feelings.  A Share Box is also available should children wish to alert school staff to private concerns.

 

The school has a system of sanctions and rewards for behaviour management for all children (see Behaviour Policy on website).  Additional behaviour management plans or risk assessments may be used where needed to support individual children who are experiencing particular difficulties.  The school participates in events such as Friendship Week or invites outside agencies in to hold workshops/ assemblies with the children.  If necessary, a record is kept of welfare concerns in line with the East Sussex County Council Child Protection procedures.

 

First Aid incidents are dealt with at the time by trained First Aiders and are reported to parents on the same day.  Any medication can be administered by school, with liaison with parents to ensure permission and dosage.

 

  1. What specialist services and expertise are available at or accessed by the school?

There are a range of agencies that work with our school. Services are either commissioned through the NHS or paid for from the school's SEN budget. Referrals to the child development clinic, school nurse, occupational therapy, speech and language, physiotherapy, Early Years Service and CAMHS (child, adolescent mental health service) can be sought by all schools.

Services commissioned by our school from the notional SEN budget include the Education Psychology Service and the Education Support, Behaviour and Attendance Service. There may be occasions when the school will fund a private speech and language assessment when it is felt that it is in the best interests of the child and paramount to moving progress forward.

 

 

  1. What training are the staff supporting children with SEND had or are having?

We encourage all staff to undergo individual Continued Professional Development.  We also consider the needs of the school and arrange whole staff training for teachers and support staff to ensure that they are well equipped to cope with the learning needs of all pupils. If a pupil requires a particular set of skills, we would match the support to the child and ensure additional training is put in place if required.

 

  1. How will my child be included in activities outside the classroom including school trips?

Our school ethos is one of inclusion for all pupils so we endeavor to ensure that every child has access to clubs, trips and other enrichment activities as part of their class.  Risk Assessments are carried out for school visits including residential trips and reasonable adjustments will be made where required.  The risk assessment may involve a meeting with parents as well as taking account of any medical advice. 

 

  1. How accessible is the school environment?

The school has an Accessibility Plan which is regularly reviewed.  The individual needs of any child would be considered once parents had taken the decision to apply for a place.  The Accessibility Plan takes into account DDA legislation https://www.gov.uk/definition-of-disability-under-equality-act-2010.

 

  1. How will the school prepare and support my child to join the school, transfer to a new school or the next stage or education or life?

We recognise that transitions can be difficult for a child with SEN and take steps to ensure that any transition is as smooth as possible. In Reception, the class teacher will arrange a visit to the pre-school provider to discuss your child.  The SENCO may be involved at this point to ensure all parties are fully involved. 

 

In Year 6, the class teacher and SENCO will meet with the SENCO from the secondary school, with all levels and provisions plans shared.  If possible, additional transition times are arranged to ensure that your child is fully prepared for secondary school.

 

If you child is moving to another school:

  • We will contact the school SENCO and ensure they know about any special provision that needs to be made for your child.
  • We will make sure that all records about your child are passed on as soon as possible.

     

    When moving classes in school, information will be passed on to the new class teacher via meetings and all SEN paperwork transferred before the start of the new academic year. Strengths and difficulties will be shared as part of a discussion about the whole child along with current and previous SEN provision.

     
  1. How are the school's resources allocated and matched to children's special education needs?

The school budget received from the Local Authority includes money for supporting pupils with SEN.  The Governors and Executive Head teacher then decides on the budget for teaching and learning (including SEN), based on the needs of the pupils in the school.  The school may receive an additional amount of 'top-up' funding for pupils with higher level needs.

 

The school will use its funding in the most appropriate way for your child.  This support may include some individual or small group teaching assistant support but this may not always be the best way to support your child.  The funding may therefore be used to put in place a range of strategies.  Funding may also be used to purchase specialist equipment or support from other specialist support services.

 

  1. How is the decision made about what type and how much support my child will receive?

All class teachers meet with the Senior Leadership Team at regular intervals during the school year at Pupil Progress Meetings.  We also look closely at the provisions that have been in place and their effectiveness and impact on the child's learning.  We consider any new concerns and plan appropriately for additional support, provision, resources or advice from outside agencies as necessary. 

 

  1. How are parents involved in the school? How can I be involved?

It is our aim that the school works in close partnership with parents and maintains regular and purposeful communications between school and home.  This includes:

  • The school website                                                 
  • Newsletters, Parent mail texts, emails and attachments
  • Voluntary involvement with outings and support of classes, e.g. reading
  • Meetings for parents on specific subjects
  • Teachers' topic letters
  • PTFA
  • Annual Parents' Questionnaire

     
  1. Who can I contact for further information?

The class teacher is the first point of contact but parents are also welcome to directly contact the SENCO about any concerns. For general information, the East Sussex County Council CZone contains a Special Needs section with guidance and information for parents.

 

If you are considering applying for a place in this school and your child has special educational needs, then please arrange a visit to look round the school and discuss your child with either the Executive Head teacher or Head of School. Other services that may help you if you are applying for a school place are:

 

Admissions: www.eastsussex.gov.uk     

 

 








Logo best qualitym.jpg
 

SEND Offer – March 2014

 

 

  1. How does the school know if my child needs help?

We share information about the additional needs of individual children at transition meetings with their pre-school provider before they enter Reception.  Your child may already have identified needs and we will work closely with you to ensure we can meet their needs as they come into primary school.  We hold initial meetings with parents to share information and this provides an opportunity to discuss any concerns you may have the child's teacher.  This may then lead to a meeting with the Class Teacher and Special Needs Co-ordinator (SENCO) to discuss next steps. 

 

All children are screened for language difficulties during their first year in school and follow up support put in place as necessary.

 

The identification of special educational needs may also arise as a part of observations and discussion which is a normal part of class teaching at any time during your child's primary schooling.  Pupil Progress meetings between teachers, subject leaders, SENCO and Headteacher also provide a chance to investigate an individual child's development.

 

How will school staff support my child?

The class teacher will take responsibility for the daily provision for your child and will be supported and advised the school SENCO where necessary.  The teacher will discuss with you any support that they think is needed that is additional and different to what we would offer to children as part of our usual practice.  If you and the teacher identify a need for a specific in school assessment or involvement for any outside specialist services then the SENCO will talk to you about this and seek your permission to pursue a particular course of action.  The SENCO then becomes the lead person for liaising with outside agencies and keeping you and everybody in the team around your child of key events and information.

 

  1. How will the curriculum be matched to my child's needs?

High quality classroom teaching is provided for all pupils, with multi-sensory elements to all lessons that ensure all pupils have the best possible access to their learning. Adjusted plans and resources for individual pupils is the next step in responding to children who may have special needs.  For example, a child will be given the opportunity to record information in different ways such as using a laptop, camera or recording device or may undergo a short intervention programme to boost their reading.  This will enable your child to access a broad, balanced and relevant curriculum. Parents will always be made aware and involved in discussion about significant additional support given to their child.

 

If you child is not making the expected progress and has specific gaps in their understanding, they may work within a smaller group of children with access to adult support. Any intervention (steps taken to provide additional support) will be discussed with you.  They may take place in or outside the classroom and may be led by the teacher, support assistant or specialist agency from outside school provided for that purpose.

 

Further specific support may also be provided through a Statement of Educational Needs or an Education, Health and Care Plan (EHCP). This means your child will have been identified by the class teacher and SENCO as needing a particularly high level of individual or small group teaching which cannot be provided from the budget available to the school.

 

  1. How will both you and I know how my child is doing and how will you help me to support my child's learning?

General information about class organisation and learning is shared with parents at the beginning of each school year via a 'Meet the Teacher' meeting.  Termly topic letters are also sent out with information about homework and how best to support children at home. 

 

We adopt an open door policy for any daily information that needs to be shared between school and home, before and after school.  Parents and teachers can arrange a more private meeting should there be issues of a more private or serious nature to discuss.  In certain cases, a home-school communication book may be used to share information on a daily basis.

 

Parent Consultation evenings take place twice a year, with a written report sent home in the summer term and the chance to discuss the contents of the report at an Open Afternoon.Parents are given information about the levels children should be working at for their age and also about the expected rate of progress for Maths, Reading and Writing.  Outside agencies involved with some children provide reports and information about attainment and progress for health based needs, such as Speech and Language or physical development.

 

  1. What support will there be for my child's overall well-being?

Being a small school means that we have provide a strong, nurturing environment. We work in partnership with parents to ensure that all changes in a child's demeanour and behaviour are shared and we welcome information about situations outside of school that may affect a child's emotional or physical well-being.

 

PSHE is a valued part of our Curriculum and the children follow a programme of learning to help them develop good emotional literacy in relation to their well-being and self-esteem.  We use activities such as Circle Time to ensure that children have an opportunity to discuss their own feelings.  A Share Box is also available should children wish to alert school staff to private concerns.

 

The school has a system of sanctions and rewards for behaviour management for all children (see Behaviour Policy on website).  Additional behaviour management plans or risk assessments may be used where needed to support individual children who are experiencing particular difficulties.  The school participates in events such as Anti-Bullying Week or invites outside agencies in to hold workshops/ assemblies with the children.  If necessary, a record is kept of welfare concerns in line with the East Sussex County Council Child Protection procedures.

 

First Aid incidents are dealt with at the time by trained First Aiders and are reported to parents on the same day.  Any medication can be administered by school, with liaison with parents to ensure permission and dosage.

 

  1. What specialist services and expertise are available at or accessed by the school?

There are a range of agencies that work in schools, within the Rother Alliance.  These include the Education Psychology Service, the Language and Learning Support Service, the Education Support, Behaviour and Attendance Service and the Speech and Language Therapy Service.  If necessary, we work with parents to refer children to the NHS or other relevant services.

 

Within our cluster group (R2S3 – Rural Rother School Supporting Success), we have access to a qualified dyslexia teacher who is able to draw up individualised learning plans for children with dyslexic tendencies, after working with the child.

 

  1. What training are the staff supporting children with SEND had or are having?

We encourage all staff to undergo individual Continued Professional Development.  We also consider the needs of the school and arrange whole staff training for teachers and support staff to ensure that they are well equipped to cope with the learning needs of all pupils. If a pupil requires a particular set of skills, we would match the support to the child and ensure additional training is put in place if required.

 

  1. How will my child be included in activities outside the classroom including school trips?

Our school ethos is one of inclusion for all pupils so we endeavour to ensure that every child has access to clubs, trips and other enrichment activities as part of their class.  Risk Assessments are carried out for school visits including residential trips and reasonable adjustments will be made where required.  The risk assessment may involve a meeting with parents as well as taking account of any medical advice. 

 

  1. How accessible is the school environment?

The school has an Accessibility Plan which is regularly reviewed.  The individual needs of any child would be considered once parents had taken the decision to apply for a place.  The Accessibility Plan takes into account DDA legislation https://www.gov.uk/definition-of-disability-under-equality-act-2010.

 

  1. How will the school prepare and support my child to join the school, transfer to a new school or the next stage or education or life?

We recognise that transitions can be difficult for a child with SEN and take steps to ensure that any transition is as smooth as possible. In Reception, the class teacher will arrange a visit to the pre-school provider to discuss your child.  The SENCO may be involved at this point to ensure all parties are fully involved. 

 

In Year 6, the class teacher and SENCO will meet with the SENCO from the secondary school, with all levels and provisions plans shared.  If possible, additional transition times are arranged to ensure that your child is fully prepared for secondary school.

 

If you child is moving to another school:

  • We will contact the school SENCO and ensure they know about any special provision that needs to be made for your child.
  • We will make sure that all records about your child are passed on as soon as possible.

     

    When moving classes in school, information will be passed on to the new class teacher via meetings and all paperwork transferred before the start of the new year.  Strengths, weaknesses and difficulties will be shared as part of a discussion about the whole child.  Provision plans and levels are shared at these meetings.

     
  1. How are the school's resources allocated and matched to children's special education needs?

The school budget received from the Local Authority includes money for supporting pupils with SEN.  The Governors and Headteacher then decides on the budget for teaching and learning (including SEN), based on the needs of the pupils in the school.  The school may receive an additional amount of 'top-up' funding for pupils with higher level needs.

 

The school will use its funding in the most appropriate way for your child.  This support may include some individual or small group teaching assistant support but this may not always be the best way to support your child.  The funding may therefore be used to put in place a range of strategies.  Funding may also be used to purchase specialist equipment or support from other specialist support services.

 

  1. How is the decision made about what type and how much support my child will receive?

All class teachers meet with the Headteacher and SENCO at regular intervals during the school year at Pupil Progress Meetings.  We also look closely at the provisions that have been in place and their effectiveness and impact on the child's learning.  We consider any new concerns and plan appropriately for additional support, provision, resources or advice from outside agencies as necessary.  Provision Plans are constructed and reviewed for all children on the SEN register as part of this process. A copy of a child's Provision Plan is provided for parents.

 

  1. How are parents involved in the school? How can I be involved?

It is our aim that the school works in close partnership with parents and maintains regular and purposeful communications between school and home.  This includes:

  • The school website                                                 
  • Newsletters, Parentmail texts, emails and attachments
  • Voluntary involvement with outings and support of classes, e.g. reading
  • Meetings for parents on specific subjects
  • Teachers' topic letters
  • PTFA
  • Annual Parents' Questionnaire

     
  1. Who can I contact for further information?

The class teacher is the first point of contact but parents are also welcome to directly contact the SENCO about any concerns. For general information, the East Sussex County Council CZone contains a Special Needs section with guidance and information for parents.

 

If you are considering applying for a place in this school and your child has special educational needs, then please arrange a visit to look round the school and discuss your child with the Headteacher.  Other services that may help you if you are applying for a school place are:

 

Admissions: www.eastsussex.gov.uk